Why it’s Never Too Late for A Master’s in Design Studies

Form follows function—this applies not only to art and design but to STEM majors, business and marketing majors, and humanities majors.  How?  Let’s take a closer look.

1. STEM and Design

STEM and design go hand-in hand.  Design work requires critical thinking and planning to solve complicated, community-based problems. When STEM students consider projects like building a self-propelled vehicle, or designing a sustainable garden ecosystem, they need to draw on their scientific knowledge in addition to their design knowledge.

When Steve Jobs designed the first Macintosh computers, he cared as much about the engineering and programming as he did about the aesthetic and form of the product—that the appearance of the product should match the seamlessness of the math and science behind it—even down to the font.

2. Business and Design

A great business idea isn’t going to work without great design.  They go hand-in-hand.  At the center of any business plan is user experience, or UX.  Design helps business students understand how user experience and design interface are related.  Business majors should focus on learning UX principles.  What does this mean?

3. Humanities, Social Sciences, and Design

Design is embedded in our everyday lives—with the intent to improve standards of living for people.  How we listen to music.  How we talk to people.  How we buy food.  How we consume media.  How we go to the doctor.  How we use transportation.  How we raise our children.  Where we live and why.

Design education promotes visual literacy—from signs, symbols, emblems, pictures, and emojis, design is intrinsic to our daily perceptions of the world around us.

Its focus on critical thinking encourages designers in the humanities and social sciences to re-imagine how we think about the world’s problems: pollution, overpopulation, poverty, hunger, healthcare—and how we create positive “user” experiences to solve those problems.